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Personal Manifesto March 25, 2009

Posted by jr4024 in culture, gender, race, structure.
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Josephina Ragon

Burcar

FSCT 301

Manifesto

 

I was the first girl born into a white, middle class, Italian, Catholic family of five children in a suburban area. My parents grew up in Brooklyn but chose to move to Long Island to raise their children in a better environment then they had grown up with. I was born female and was assumed to become a well brought-up woman. I was born white and was assumed to marry within my race and produce more of this race. I was born into the middle class and was assumed to achieve a higher status and the ability to support myself. I was born Italian and was assumed to treat my father with the upmost respect, take full responsibility as the oldest, and always put my family first. I was born Catholic and was assumed to be a heterosexual, complete all my sacraments, get married, and bear children.

Since being a student at William Smith College, I have taken certain courses that have changed my life in ways that I have not even fully explained to my parents. I have developed endless amounts of reason, through education, for why I do not consider myself Catholic anymore. This distance created away from my religion also allowed me to become a passionate feminist which plays an important role in how I live my life. As a result of this awareness: one of my majors is Women Studies, I am a very active member of Women’s Collective, NARAL pro-choice, and PRIDE alliance here on campus. With Women Studies as my major, I dream to work at an organization whose goal is to empower women in one way or another. Through the Women’s Collective, I have gained the courage and motivation to march around campus during Take Back the Night and I am currently co-directing the Vagina Monologues. In the pro-choice club, the majority of what we do involves sex education as well as giving out contraception to help create a more safe experience for college students. Last but not least, in PRIDE alliance, these members are very close friends of mine and I hold the Publicity/PR chair for events such as films and days that celebrate homosexual liberation.

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Blake and the Active Cyborg February 3, 2009

Posted by animatingthecyborg in class, cyborgs, gender, monstrosity, poetry, race.
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Since the next two weeks of class are broken up with travel and printmaking workshops, I just wanted to take a moment to highlight the choreography of the course and how the lecture on Blake today figures into the foundation for the rest of the semester.

Two of the key questions guiding the course, which can be found on the syllabus, are:

  1. What counts as “authentic” human experience and what does it mean to be human?
  2. How is the cyborg narrative been shaped through visual culture?

Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience call into question dominant cultural values (the hegemony of society) by creating fissures in the strict binaries by which society is organized and structured. So, when we consider what counts as authentic human experience, notions of object, personhood and citizenship are destabilized in the matrix that makes up dominant culture in 18th century Britain.

Personhood and citizenship are particularly important here as the Songs act as a prophecy or beacon where the Other has no proper place in society—and while most of you are familiar with the concept of the Other, for those of you who are not familiar with this idea: the Other is a person or group of people who are marginalized or ostracized by the dominant culture. The Other, or “boundary being” (as the Other typically survives on the fringes of society) is usually alienated along gender, race and/or class lines.

Blake shines a light on the “authenticity” or validity of the dominant culture’s binaries by introducing characters such as the Lamb, who, in the Songs of Innocence, appears to be “buying into” the organization of culture and the marginalizing of people as Other. The lamb is a familiar figure to readers (both today and in the 18th/19th century), because of both its Biblical and agricultural uses. However, by Songs of Experience, the Lamb is transformed into the Tyger (although familiar to us today, it was a creature most people in England had never seen), and the Tyger is coded as a strange and monstrous figure.

By taking something familiar and non-threatening as the Lamb and transforming it into the Tyger, Blake demonstrates that the Other is a part of us: every Lamb has the possibility of breaking from the herd, or flock, and expressing its independence as a person and thinker, thereby morphing into a Tyger—sameness (as can be seen in the images of the flock of sheep—sameness can also be read as “Innocence”), then, is abandoned for individuality (or awareness—or “Experience”), a truly scary concept in the wake of the French Revolution and the civil unrest in Britain at the time.

Exploring the binaries that govern the Songs, as well as the fissures that are created within its matrix, we can gain a better sense of how the subject position of the Other (or “boundary being”) is a monstrous concept—which aligns it not only with other monsters, but highlights the theoretical underpinnings that shape current cultural narratives of the cyborg today.

Although we cannot replicate the same relief etching process invented by Blake (which I explained earlier in class), our first project is in the spirit of William Blake’s work. You can even reduce the act of physically engraving the linoleum blocks down to the kinds of binaries that govern different embodiments of cyborgs today: encoded/decoded, full/empty, subject/object, strange/familiar.

In a similar way the cyborg is a hybrid creature (cybernetic, yet organic; constructed and programmed, yet aware and desiring an identity), this class, too, is a hybrid. We’re combining critical theory and creative expression, examining different incarnations of the cyborg in visual culture along the way. It’s a complicated dance (it’s a 300 level course, after all). Right now, we’re merely learning the steps so we can move on to more complicated movements.

So hopefully this helps highlight the diagram of the dance steps.